A WAREHOUSE - 12/12/1970

NEW ORLEANS, LA - U.S.A.



Venue Address: 1820 Tchoupitoulas St. - New Orleans, LA 
Promotion: Beaver Productions
Event: In Concert

Also Performing:
Kansas

Setlist:
Roadhouse Blues
Back Door Man
Love Her Madly
When The Music's Over
Riders On The Storm (Beginning)
Ship Of Fools
Crawling King Snake
L.A. Woman
Hyacinth House
      "You know what really burns my ass?"
Maggie M'Gill >
Been Down So Long >
Hoochie Coochie Man
Who Do You Love
Palace In The Canyon (Poem)
Light My Fire*
      -Summertime (Instrumental)
Love Me Two Times
Riders On The Storm
Soul Kitchen
The End

* Featuring Members of 'Kansas'

Recordings / Film:
Stage Recording

Photographers:
Unidentified (Amateur & Professional)

Reviews / Info:
-8:00pm scheduled start time.
-Members of 'Kansas' appear on-stage with The Doors during this performance.
-Frustrated with Jim Morrison's performance, John Densmore leaves the stage and the show ends.
-'The End' is the last song Jim Morrison ever sings on-stage with The Doors.
-A stage recording of this performance is made by an employee of the Warehouse.
-This concert will prove to be Jim Morrison's last on-stage performance with The Doors.
-The Doors return to New Orleans in 1972.


"Sadly, I watched The Doors break up in real time on stage at A Warehouse in New Orleans. Morrison was so loaded he could barely stand up, and he looked like a homeless person. He had a big bushy beard and he looked like he hadn't washed his hair in a month. I didn't recognize him until he started talking. They were terrible. It still ranks as one of the worst shows I have ever attended.

I can't recall any specific songs they played that night. Morrisson told some very bad jokes. The one I remember is, "You know what really burns my ass? Flames about this high." (waving his hand about butt high). He thought that was hilarious. He kept acting like he was going to drop his pants; that was a reference to something that had happened in Florida, I heard later. He was slurring and staggering, obviously very intoxicated on something or some combination of things. Manzarek was set up stage left facing outward, and he seldom if ever looked back at Jim. He was constantly looking at his watch.

Morrison left the stage during an instrumental break and didn't come back until he was bodily thrown onto the stage by a stage hand or somebody after the rest of the band had improvised an awkward ending to the song they were playing. When they started the next song, he staggered up to the mic and began trying to sing the lyrics of the previous song. Manzarek kept looking at his watch. Finally Densmore stood up, yelled something I couldn't understand, threw his drumsticks out onto the stage, left the stage, and that was that. There was no encore. It was the last time they ever performed with Morrison. He left for France shortly thereafter.

It was awful to watch; I had been so jazzed about going to see them, and then so let down at the colossal trainwreck that the show turned into. It was one of a couple of historic events that I witnessed at A Warehouse. Another was the Fake Fleetwood Mac show a couple of years later. I went to a lot of other great shows there also. The Allman Bros. (with Berry and Duane) opening for Pink Floyd on the Ummagumma tour, for one. The Allmans played until after midnight, and the Floyds played until 2 or so. Four bucks! Those were the days..."

Gordon Gunn
Austin, TX
Copyright © 2010 Gordon Gunn
http://www.CrystalFlavola.com

A Special Thanks to Gordon Gunn for providing his review of the concert to MildEquator.com!

A WAREHOUSE RECORDING IN NEW ORLEANS:


Contributed By: George Friedman
Special Thanks: Chris Simondet

On December 12th, 1970, four days after his 27th birthday, Jim Morrison gave his final live performance with The Doors at a rock and roll venue in New Orleans known as 'A Warehouse'. A recording of this performance was made, and for years the tape has been the subject of much speculation concerning its contents. Following its re-discovery by stage manager George Friedman, the original 7" 1800ft reel has been kept safely in storage, allowing few details to escape to public knowledge. At MildEquator.com, we're proud to feature here for the first time ever - actual photographs of the tape and box to show fans and collectors of The Doors exactly what awaits to be heard...


TRACKLIST:


Roadhouse Blues
Back Door Man
Love Her Madly
When The Music's Over
Riders On The Storm (Beginning)
Ship Of Fools
Crawling King Snake
L.A. Woman
Hyacinth House
      "You know what really burns my ass?"
Maggie M'Gill >
Been Down So Long >
Hoochie Coochie Man
Who Do You Love
Palace In The Canyon (Poem)
Light My Fire*
      -Summertime (Instrumental)
Love Me Two Times
Riders On The Storm
Soul Kitchen
The End

* Featuring Members of 'Kansas'

In an e-mail written in 2011, George Friedman discusses the tape:

"I received word that your column had had some inquiry about the lost tape of the Doors concert at the Warehouse, Jim Morrison's very last performance. The tape isn't lost. I've had it in a safety deposit box for several years. I was a stage manager at the Warehouse during that and most of the shows at that classic venue. The tape is in two-channel stereo, having been recorded by 'Stagehand Bob' on the same machine he used for just about every early show at the Warehouse.

My recollection is that I came upon the tape when Beaver Productions moved its offices out of the Warehouse, Uptown into a building at the Riverbend. The Doors tape, along with a stack of other Warehouse show tapes, were cast off and left behind as debris during the move. The rest of the tapes may have been destroyed. I regret leaving behind the Jimi Hendrix tape.

At sometime along the way, I spoke with a gentleman named Sugarman, who represented himself to be a manager of the Doors. Mr. Sugarman said that the keyboard player had only a curiosity interest in that night's rendition of 'Riders on the Storm,' if I have that song's name right, but had no real interest in acquiring the tape, Jim Morrison's last performance notwithstanding.

The Doors shows back then were chaotic, but the Warehouse performance was more music than theater. An exception to that would be at the very end of the show, when Morrison, who was wacked near a stupor that night, suddenly jumped up, grabbed the microphone and then smashed it right through the floor of the stage. What an ending to a great show. Nobody knew it when it happened, but the music indeed was over when they turned out the lights and the Doors left the stage."

Copyright © George Friedman

TECHNICAL INFO:

TAPE SIZE: 7"
TAPE SPEED: 3.75IPS
TAPE LENGTH: 1800ft At 3.75ips = 96mins (Side A)/96mins (Side B)











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